December 14, 2019- Advent 14, Luke 14- Jesus is Still Lord of the Sabbath, Come to the Banquet, The Way of the Cross Has a Cost

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Read Luke 14.

Jesus asks yet again, “Is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath or not?,” after He healed the man with dropsy.  Jesus heals people many times on the Sabbath, whether the Pharisees liked it or not.  He extends His gifts of wholeness and healing in ways that the religious legalists found challenging to accept and difficult to understand.

When you are invited by someone to a wedding feast, do not sit down in a place of honor, lest someone more distinguished than you be invited by him, and he who invited you both will come and say to you, ‘Give your place to this person,’ and then you will begin with shame to take the lowest place. But when you are invited, go and sit in the lowest place, so that when your host comes he may say to you, ‘Friend, move up higher.’ Then you will be honored in the presence of all who sit at table with you. For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humbles himself will be exalted.” Luke 14:8-11 (ESV)

Jesus teaches that we should not seek our own honor, but to let others elevate us.  We should not overestimate our own importance.  We appreciate the humility of others.  Jesus was the ultimate example of humility as He put on human flesh and subjected Himself to death on a cross.  In His act of humility and shame, He was lifted up above all others, the King of Kings. We should not hesitate to take the places of “lesser honor.”

Jesus also encourages us to be generous with others, especially those who will never be able to repay us for our kindness.  He also explains to the Pharisees and other people born into the Jewish tradition that the kingdom and inheritance that was prepared for the Jewish people will largely end up being inhabited by those who were once outside of Israel.

“A man once gave a great banquet and invited many. And at the time for the banquet he sent his servant to say to those who had been invited, ‘Come, for everything is now ready.’ But they all alike began to make excuses. The first said to him, ‘I have bought a field, and I must go out and see it. Please have me excused.’ And another said, ‘I have bought five yoke of oxen, and I go to examine them. Please have me excused.’ And another said, ‘I have married a wife, and therefore I cannot come.’ So the servant came and reported these things to his master. Then the master of the house became angry and said to his servant, ‘Go out quickly to the streets and lanes of the city, and bring in the poor and crippled and blind and lame.’ And the servant said, ‘Sir, what you commanded has been done, and still there is room.’ And the master said to the servant, ‘Go out to the highways and hedges and compel people to come in, that my house may be filled. For I tell you, none of those men who were invited shall taste my banquet.’” Luke 14:16-24 (ESV)

The Jewish people largely rejected Jesus’ message- finding excuses not to attend the wedding banquet that He prepared for Him.  So He extended His invitation to all.  His invitation is still open, to all of humanity, for anyone who would hear the Good News and be brought to faith. We never know who will join us at Jesus’ table, so we are called to welcome all who will come.

Now great crowds accompanied him, and he turned and said to them, “If anyone comes to me and does not hate his own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters, yes, and even his own life, he cannot be my disciple. Whoever does not bear his own cross and come after me cannot be my disciple. For which of you, desiring to build a tower, does not first sit down and count the cost, whether he has enough to complete it? Otherwise, when he has laid a foundation and is not able to finish, all who see it begin to mock him,saying, ‘This man began to build and was not able to finish.’ Luke 14:25-30 (ESV)

Many people followed Jesus around because of the miracles he performed, especially the miracles of feeding multitudes.  The idea that Jesus would be some sort of magical bread king did much to heighten His popularity.  But learning the real cost of discipleship thinned down the numbers.  Jesus wasn’t about just filling bellies temporarily.  The life of following Jesus is not always easy.  However, those He calls He also equips.

No one can come to me unless the Father who sent me draws him. And I will raise him up on the last day. John 6:44 (ESV)

God calls us through His means of grace- through hearing the Gospel, through our baptism, and through the prayers of the saints.  By faith, which itself is a gift of God, God gives us what we need to follow Jesus and assures us that we will be raised up with him on the Last Day.

“Salt is good, but if salt has lost its taste, how shall its saltiness be restored? It is of no use either for the soil or for the manure pile. It is thrown away. He who has ears to hear, let him hear.” Luke 14:34-35 (ESV)

In our culture, referring to someone as “salty”  usually means that a person has had many hard years of experience and their language is a little rough around the edges- like a long time sailor that has spent years at sea.

Jesus was referring to a form of salt used in the Middle East that was not 100% salt, and that over time the sodium chloride would leach out of it, leaving it tasteless.

Like that Middle Eastern salt we can have the saltiness leached out of us= the world wears on us.  Our own desires and selfishness can keep us from the study of God’s Word, and from worship and prayer. We can very easily become cynical, tired and colorless.

In these times we see our need for Jesus, our need for the nourishment only He can give to keep us “salty,” to keep us firmly in Him.

Lord, we pray that we would humbly accept the invitation to Your feast.  We pray that you would give us the grace to invite others and extend Your hospitality to even the most unlikely.  We trust in Your promises and we look forward to You coming back to remake and restore this world and establish Your kingdom forever.

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