January 21, 2020 The Danger of Frenemies, and the Future- Isaiah 39

Hezekiah and Babylonian king

At that time Merodach-baladan the son of Baladan, king of Babylon, sent envoys with letters and a present to Hezekiah, for he heard that he had been sick and had recovered. And Hezekiah welcomed them gladly. And he showed them his treasure house, the silver, the gold, the spices, the precious oil, his whole armory, all that was found in his storehouses. There was nothing in his house or in all his realm that Hezekiah did not show them.  Then Isaiah the prophet came to King Hezekiah, and said to him, “What did these men say? And from where did they come to you?” Hezekiah said, “They have come to me from a far country, from Babylon.”  He said, “What have they seen in your house?” Hezekiah answered, “They have seen all that is in my house. There is nothing in my storehouses that I did not show them.”
 Then Isaiah said to Hezekiah, “Hear the word of the Lord of hosts:  Behold, the days are coming, when all that is in your house, and that which your fathers have stored up till this day, shall be carried to Babylon. Nothing shall be left, says the Lord. And some of your own sons, who will come from you, whom you will father, shall be taken away, and they shall be eunuchs in the palace of the king of Babylon.”  Then Hezekiah said to Isaiah, “The word of the Lord that you have spoken is good.” For he thought, “There will be peace and security in my days.” Isaiah 39 (ESV)

Many of us have people we know as “frenemies-” the coworker who has no problem being cordial on the surface, but who will quietly run people under the bus if it benefits him or her, or the neighbor who is so engaging and polite out in the open, but who won’t hesitate to call the police on your back yard party or bonfire if it disturbs them.

These are people whose alliances aren’t trustworthy.  These are people who will be kind when it serves their purpose, but will also sell people out when it serves their purpose.

In the previous chapter of Isaiah we learned that Hezekiah was desperately ill and thought that he was about to die.  He prayed to God and God gave him an extra fifteen years.  Unfortunately after his miraculous restoration to health, Hezekiah seemed to forget that all of his good things came from God, and he got a little too friendly with his frenemies, the Babylonians.

Sometimes we wonder why governments make unholy alliances with frenemies. Sometimes alliances are made in an effort to keep the peace, such as the failed tactic played by Neville Chamberlain, where he negotiated with the Nazis with the erroneous thinking that appeasing the Nazis would lead to “peace in our time.”

Or is it, as it seems in the example of Hezekiah, that he was making a display of his own strength and hegemony- a sort of bragging, almost.  Instead of keeping his trust in the Lord and his treasures close to his chest, Hezekiah believed that an alliance with Babylon would help keep Judah safe from the Assyrians.  Sadly, Hezekiah’s trust in the leaders of Babylon would eventually lead to the nation being taken over by Babylon.

Showing the wolves the goodies and giving them the keys to the gate is no way to protect the sheep inside.

Hezekiah was glad when Isaiah told him that “there would be peace and security in my days,” but what of the generations to come, the ones who would be carried off to Babylon and made to be eunuchs and slaves of the Babylonians?

We also have to ask the same questions about frenemies in the society we live in today.  The influence of the church in our society is declining.  Do we dialogue with and trust in the ways and tactics of the world, which can be a frenemy, or do we trust God for what we need to reach out to the world?

We can’t be satisfied with “peace and security in my days.”  As good stewards of God’s creation and in service to our neighbors, people for whom Jesus died to save, it is our duty and joy to pass on the faith.  We need to trust God and faithfully teach our children and grandchildren the faith, and to care about the generations to come.

Lord, we pray that we would trust in You alone and not in our wisdom, wealth or anything that isn’t You. Keep us from making unholy alliances that would compromise our witness or our faith in You.  Give us the words and Your wisdom and passion for spreading the Gospel and reaching out to a world that is hungry for You.

 

 

 

 

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