May 4, 2020- Jesus Weeps Over Jerusalem – Luke 19:28-44

Jesus weeps over Jerusalem by Giovanni

And when he (Jesus) had said these things, he went on ahead, going up to Jerusalem. When he drew near to Bethphage and Bethany, at the mount that is called Olivet, he sent two of the disciples, saying, “Go into the village in front of you, where on entering you will find a colt tied, on which no one has ever yet sat. Untie it and bring it here. If anyone asks you, ‘Why are you untying it?’ you shall say this: ‘The Lord has need of it.’”  So those who were sent went away and found it just as he had told them. And as they were untying the colt, its owners said to them, “Why are you untying the colt?” And they said, “The Lord has need of it.” And they brought it to Jesus, and throwing their cloaks on the colt, they set Jesus on it.  And as he rode along, they spread their cloaks on the road. As he was drawing near—already on the way down the Mount of Olives—the whole multitude of his disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works that they had seen, saying, “Blessed is the King who comes in the name of the Lord! Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!” And some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, rebuke your disciples.” He answered, “I tell you, if these were silent, the very stones would cry out.”

And when he (Jesus) drew near and saw the city, he wept over it saying, “Would that you, even you, had known on this day the things that make for peace! But now they are hidden from your eyes. For the days will come upon you, when your enemies will set up a barricade around you and surround you and hem you in on every side and tear you down to the ground, you and your children within you. And they will not leave one stone upon another in you, because you did not know the time of your visitation.” Luke 19:28-44 (ESV)

There are two instances in Scripture where it is recorded that Jesus wept.   When His friend Lazarus died, Jesus wept. (John 11:35)  He weeps again here, not for Himself, but from the city of Jerusalem and the people of Israel.  Even though Jesus is the one going to His death, He weeps over the fate of the people who are right around Him, the people who He came to save, the people who reject Him.

The Pharisees wanted Jesus to keep His disciples quiet, but instead, Jesus reminds the Pharisees that, “if these were silent, the very stones would cry out.”

“The heavens declare the glory of God, and the sky above proclaims his handiwork, as we learn in Psalm 19:1.  Yet we don’t always see or acknowledge God’s hands in all things.  Even as God’s people we are afraid to share the love of God and the good news of the Gospel.  We don’t know what to say or when or how to say it.  We have friends and family who hear the Good News but it doesn’t register with them, just like the people of Jerusalem who had Jesus come to them in flesh and they couldn’t recognize Him for Who He was.

Jesus knew that He was on the hard, long road to Calvary as He came to the city of Jerusalem.  He also knew what was going to happen in Jerusalem in about another 35 years. In 70 AD the Romans captured and destroyed the city of Jerusalem.  Jesus wept for the people in the city who had no idea who He was. Jesus wept knowing that most of them would never know that He came to die to save them from their sins.  Jesus knew that many of His people would die without ever hearing the life-saving Gospel and coming to faith in Him.

Are we disturbed by the thought of people who Jesus bled and died to save are lost because they never heard the Good News?  The apostle Paul teaches us that saving faith in Jesus comes by hearing (Romans 10:17.)  The Holy Spirit works through the preaching of the Gospel and the teaching of God’s Word. Not everyone who hears will come to faith, and it is the Holy Spirit who works through preaching and teaching.  So all we can do is what we are told to do as believers in Jesus- preach the Word, tell the truth, and pray for those around us.

Do we weep – and pray- for those right here in our own community who haven’t heard about Jesus?  Do we reach out in love to those who have not yet come to saving faith, or are we going to leave it to the stones to cry out?

It’s by the grace of God that anyone comes to saving faith in Jesus.  It is a gift.  But God works through means, which means He works in and through His body, His followers, the church.  We cannot stay silent.

Lord, give us the courage to be bold in our faith and to live lives that glorify You.  Help us to share our faith and to pray for those who have not heard and who have not been brought to faith in You yet.

 

 

 

 

May 1, 2020- The Splendor and Majesty of the Lord- Psalm 111

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I will give thanks to the Lord with my whole heart, in the company of the upright, in the congregation.
Great are the works of the Lord, studied by all who delight in them.Full of splendor and majesty is his work, and his righteousness endures forever.             

He has caused his wondrous works to be remembered; the Lord is gracious and merciful.
He provides food for those who fear him; he remembers his covenant forever.
He has shown his people the power of his works, in giving them the inheritance of the nations.

The works of his hands are faithful and just; all his precepts are trustworthy; they are established forever and ever, to be performed with faithfulness and uprightness.
He sent redemption to his people; he has commanded his covenant forever.
Holy and awesome is his name!
The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom; all those who practice it have a good understanding.
His praise endures forever!  Psalm 111 (ESV)

It’s always a good time to remember the majesty and goodness of God. There is a comfort in knowing that He is beyond our circumstances, that He is in control of what happens, and that He so loved the world that He came down to the world in human flesh.

It’s easy to get caught in the moment and to forget that it’s just a moment.

He has caused his wondrous works to be remembered; the Lord is gracious and merciful.
He provides food for those who fear him; he remembers his covenant forever.
He has shown his people the power of his works, in giving them the inheritance of the nations.

We might wonder if God is really there or really listening to us. He is there. He is listening.

The Gospel is preached so many times in the prayers of the Psalms.

He sent redemption to his people; he has commanded his covenant forever.
Holy and awesome is his name!
The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom; all those who practice it have a good understanding.
His praise endures forever! 

Lord, may we seek our comfort and rest in You, knowing that You have sent us redemption, and that You hear our prayers.

April 28, 2020 – Thy Kingdom Come, But Probably Not the Way We Think It Will- Luke 17:20-37

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Being asked by the Pharisees when the kingdom of God would come, he answered them, “The kingdom of God is not coming in ways that can be observed, nor will they say, ‘Look, here it is!’ or ‘There!’ for behold, the kingdom of God is in the midst of you.”

And he said to the disciples, “The days are coming when you will desire to see one of the days of the Son of Man, and you will not see it. And they will say to you, ‘Look, there!’ or ‘Look, here!’ Do not go out or follow them. For as the lightning flashes and lights up the sky from one side to the other, so will the Son of Man be in his day. But first he must suffer many things and be rejected by this generation. Just as it was in the days of Noah, so will it be in the days of the Son of Man. They were eating and drinking and marrying and being given in marriage, until the day when Noah entered the ark, and the flood came and destroyed them all. Likewise, just as it was in the days of Lot—they were eating and drinking, buying and selling, planting and building, but on the day when Lot went out from Sodom, fire and sulfur rained from heaven and destroyed them all— so will it be on the day when the Son of Man is revealed. On that day, let the one who is on the housetop, with his goods in the house, not come down to take them away, and likewise let the one who is in the field not turn back. Remember Lot’s wife. Whoever seeks to preserve his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life will keep it. I tell you, in that night there will be two in one bed. One will be taken and the other left. There will be two women grinding together. One will be taken and the other left.”And they said to him, “Where, Lord?” He said to them, “Where the corpse is, there the vultures will gather.” Luke 17:20-37 (ESV)

Most of us have heard the narrative regarding the end of the world in which there is portrayed to be a rapture of the church that is loosely based upon these verses.

Whether one believes in a rapture of the church or not (amillennialism is the eschatological- or end times- teaching traditionally held by the Lutheran church, meaning we generally aren’t into the rapture concept) one thing is certain.  As we affirm in all of the ecumenical creeds, Christ has risen from the dead, and He will come to judge the living from the dead.

There are people who will try to set dates and speculate on when Jesus will return, and they are all going to be wrong. We know Jesus is coming back, but we have no way of knowing when.  As He says, people will be behaving like in the days of Noah- doing their things, openly mocking God, and feeling no sorrow or repentance for their sins, blissfully unaware that judgment is around the corner.  That is a frightening concept, for anyone to become the object of the wrath of God, but it is also a reminder that God is the creator and we are the created.

We pray in the Lord’s Prayer, the third petition, which is the most difficult of the petitions to pray and mean it: Thy will be done. This is in direct contrast to the whispering of the serpent in the Garden, whose call to temptation always begins and ends with, You will be like God.

Remember Lot’s wife. Whoever seeks to preserve his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life will keep it. 

In our baptisms we are buried with Christ, and we are born into new life with Him.

The Kingdom of God is already here, happening and unfolding.  It’s not all the way here yet.  It’s not going to be what we expect and it won’t go according to our plans. Thy will is always going to be done, whether or not we are on board with it!

In many ways this knowledge is both a warning and a relief.  A warning to keep our lamps trimmed and burning, because yes, the Bridegroom will return for us at any time, but also a relief because we know that this tenuous arrangement of “now, but not yet” living with one foot in both the worldly and heavenly kingdoms will finally be made into a complete “now and for always.” In our baptisms we are given the promise that we are God’s own child, and we receive the gift of faith. We are marked with the cross of Christ forever.

Jesus came to earth to suffer and die to save us from our sins.  He is returning for His people, to judge the living and the dead and to establish the world to come forever. And it’s all going to be done His way.

 

 

April 27, 2020 Trust God to Forgive, as We Forgive Others- Psalm 107:1-16, Luke 17:1-4

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Oh give thanks to the Lord, for he is good,for his steadfast love endures forever!

Let the redeemed of the Lord say so, whom he has redeemed from trouble and gathered in from the lands,from the east and from the west, from the north and from the south. Some wandered in desert wastes, finding no way to a city to dwell in; hungry and thirsty,their soul fainted within them.

Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble, and he delivered them from their distress. He led them by a straight way till they reached a city to dwell in. Let them thank the Lord for his steadfast love, for his wondrous works to the children of man!

For he satisfies the longing soul, and the hungry soul he fills with good things.Some sat in darkness and in the shadow of death, prisoners in affliction and in irons, for they had rebelled against the words of God, and spurned the counsel of the Most High.So he bowed their hearts down with hard labor;they fell down, with none to help.Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble,and he delivered them from their distress.

He brought them out of darkness and the shadow of death,and burst their bonds apart. Let them thank the Lord for his steadfast love, for his wondrous works to the children of man. For he shatters the doors of bronze and cuts in two the bars of iron. Psalm 107:1-16 (ESV)

And he (Jesus) said to his disciples, “Temptations to sin are sure to come, but woe to the one through whom they come! It would be better for him if a millstone were hung around his neck and he were cast into the sea than that he should cause one of these little ones to sin. Pay attention to yourselves! If your brother sins, rebuke him, and if he repents, forgive him,and if he sins against you seven times in the day, and turns to you seven times, saying, ‘I repent,’ you must forgive him.” Luke 17:1-4 (ESV)

For here we have no lasting city, but we seek the city that is to come.- Hebrews 13:14 (ESV)
The writer of Hebrews reminds us that anything we build in this world is temporary. For some people the temporary nature of this life is a comfort, because they have lived their lives in material poverty or in pain and suffering.  For others it’s a sadness to know that in a hundred years we will long since be dead and forgotten, and we can’t take our stuff with us. We wander and strive and work (and overwork) only to discover, as the Teacher of Ecclesiastes writes, that we are chasing after wind.  (Ecclesiastes 2:18-26)

Some wandered in desert wastes, finding no way to a city to dwell in; hungry and thirsty,their soul fainted within them.

Jesus is leading us to the lasting city: Then they cried to the Lord in their trouble, and he delivered them from their distress. He led them by a straight way till they reached a city to dwell in. Let them thank the Lord for his steadfast love, for his wondrous works to the children of man!

We are reminded that Jesus forgives us. Jesus brings us out of darkness and delivers us from the shadow of death (as we also learn in Psalm 23.) He brought them out of darkness and the shadow of death,and burst their bonds apart. Let them thank the Lord for his steadfast love, for his wondrous works to the children of man. For he shatters the doors of bronze and cuts in two the bars of iron.

Now that we see what Jesus has done for us and continues to do for us, we turn to our neighbors for whom Jesus also bled and died to save. Now it gets tricky for us because that old Adam who was buried in the waters of our baptism doesn’t like to stay drowned. When we remember the promises of Jesus are not just for us but also for all those other simul justus et peccators out there, our perspective on our neighbor has to change.

Because we are all saints and sinners at the same time,  as long as we draw breath on this earth, we are going to sin. We are going to do things that bring harm to our neighbors, and that will cause them to sin right along with us. Other people are going to do things that harm us as well.  Jesus gives us His remedy for our constant friction and discord with others: Pay attention to yourselves! If your brother sins, rebuke him, and if he repents, forgive him,and if he sins against you seven times in the day, and turns to you seven times, saying, ‘I repent,’ you must forgive him.”

We love because He first loved us. 1 John 4:19 (ESV)

Dearest Jesus, forgive us for those times when we have failed to love our neighbor as You love us.  You are with us no matter how many times we fail, and no matter how many valleys of shadow we must go through. Don’t let us forget that this world is not the lasting city that You are leading us toward. We are completely reliant upon You for all things, and you provide for us abundantly and graciously. Help us to pass those gifts along in Your Name.   Give us the gift of faith to trust You, and create clean hearts in us that are filled with Your love and joy.

 

April 22, 2020 – The Invitation to the Banquet- Luke 14:15-24

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When one of those who reclined at table with him (Jesus) heard these things, he said to him, “Blessed is everyone who will eat bread in the kingdom of God!” But he (Jesus) said to him, “A man once gave a great banquet and invited many. And at the time for the banquet he sent his servant to say to those who had been invited, ‘Come, for everything is now ready.’ But they all alike began to make excuses. The first said to him, ‘I have bought a field, and I must go out and see it. Please have me excused.’ And another said, ‘I have bought five yoke of oxen, and I go to examine them. Please have me excused.’ And another said, ‘I have married a wife, and therefore I cannot come.’ So the servant came and reported these things to his master. Then the master of the house became angry and said to his servant, ‘Go out quickly to the streets and lanes of the city, and bring in the poor and crippled and blind and lame.’ And the servant said, ‘Sir, what you commanded has been done, and still there is room.’ And the master said to the servant, ‘Go out to the highways and hedges and compel people to come in, that my house may be filled.For I tell you, none of those men who were invited shall taste my banquet.’” Luke 14:15-24 (ESV)

Some of us find great enjoyment in large gatherings and in ceremony and in wearing fine clothing.  Others of us are uncomfortable with and avoid large gatherings and formality.  Some of us have a hard time slowing down long enough to enjoy the feast that is spread in front of us, because we are too busy tending to all the peripheral and not-so-important things.

Jesus’ invitation to His banquet is a great honor.  It is one that requires us not necessarily to abandon the necessities of this life, but to prioritize them. Tending to one’s business and property is something we all need to do. At one time or another in our lives most people do get married, and it is important to spend time with and to cherish one’s spouse. Those are good things and parts of our vocations, but they become idolatry when we put them in a higher priority than Jesus.

The Ten Commandments show us where we fail to obey God’s Law.  We are always putting material things and activities before the things of God. Jesus reminds us of this tendency of ours to put off the invitation to His banquet because we are so distracted by the things of this world.

The other point that Jesus brings to light is that those who are poor in material things are free to be far more attentive to the things of God.  When we are in places where we are alone, hurting, or struggling, we are drawn to Jesus’ banquet.  In our loneliness and poverty and grief, God in His mercy puts us in the place where we can slow down and taste and savor the rich sweetness of His provision.  In our times of crisis and wondering, we are reminded that all provision comes from Him, and the illusion that our gifts are given apart from the grace of the Giver falls away.

In these times where our priorities have changed overnight, we can hear the call of Jesus much more clearly.  Come to the banquet! All is ready! This is a meal none of us want to miss.

Lord, we thank you for the banquet that You graciously provide for us.  Let us come to Your banquet with joy, and create in us clean hearts that long for You.  Forgive us for those many times when we forget You or put other things in the place where only You should be.  Thank You, Jesus, for giving Your life to save us, and thank You for the faith to trust that  You will never leave or forsake us.

April 19, 2020- Keep Your Lamps Trimmed and Burning- Luke 12:35-48

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“Stay dressed for action and keep your lamps burning,  and be like men who are waiting for their master to come home from the wedding feast, so that they may open the door to him at once when he comes and knocks.  Blessed are those servants whom the master finds awake when he comes. Truly, I say to you, he will dress himself for service and have them recline at table, and he will come and serve them.  If he comes in the second watch, or in the third, and finds them awake, blessed are those servants!  But know this, that if the master of the house had known at what hour the thief was coming, he would not have left his house to be broken into.  You also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an hour you do not expect.”

Peter said, “Lord, are you telling this parable for us or for all?” And the Lord said, “Who then is the faithful and wise manager, whom his master will set over his household, to give them their portion of food at the proper time?  Blessed is that servant whom his master will find so doing when he comes.  Truly, I say to you, he will set him over all his possessions.  But if that servant says to himself, ‘My master is delayed in coming,’ and begins to beat the male and female servants, and to eat and drink and get drunk,  the master of that servant will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour he does not know, and will cut him in pieces and put him with the unfaithful.  And that servant who knew his master’s will but did not get ready or act according to his will, will receive a severe beating.  But the one who did not know, and did what deserved a beating, will receive a light beating. Everyone to whom much was given, of him much will be required, and from him to whom they entrusted much, they will demand the more. Luke 12:35-48 (ESV)

One of the most beautiful Spiritual songs ever written is the traditional, “Keep Your Lamps Trimmed and Burning.”

We understand that our salvation is in Christ alone, through faith alone, by grace alone.  We don’t, and we can’t, earn our salvation in any way.  Jesus is our Suffering Servant, who paid the penalty for all the sins of the world, as John the Baptist understood when Jesus came to him to be baptized. (John 1:29)

We are, however, baptized into Jesus’ suffering and death.  Because He has set us free from the curse of the Garden, we are bound to Him, beggars at the throne of grace. We have all been given much.

Jesus has promised that He is returning to this earth and He is going to remake both heaven and earth (2 Peter 3:8-13) and we will be given incorruptible, physical bodies (1 Corinthians 15:51-53.)  We affirm the restoration of our physical bodies when we say “the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting,” when we recite the Apostle’s Creed as well.

Staying “dressed for action” is not easy.  We are distracted by the world and tempted by our own sinful desires as well as the influence of the Adversary.  Our sinful nature is nothing new.

Jesus is talking about keeping faith in Him, of knowing Who we belong to.  We were purchased with a price, our Savior’s own Body and Blood. Our motivation to serve and follow him is not one of fear of hellfire but one of gratitude and love.

In these times apocalyptic talk is very popular.  There have been multiple books, various so-called prophets and loads of random speculation on the end of the world.  Hal Lindsey once claimed the end of the world would occur in the 1980s, claiming in his book “The 1980s, Countdown to Armageddon,” that “the decade of the 1980s could very well be the last decade of history as we know it.” 

Jesus, however, taught us, “But concerning that day and hour no one knows, not even the angels of heaven, nor the Son, but the Father only.  For as were the days of Noah, so will be the coming of the Son of Man.” Matthew 24:36-37 (ESV)

The time that we might spend speculating on the timing of the end of days would be better spent in trusting Jesus and serving our neighbors.  The end of days may arrive tonight or a thousand years from now, who knows?  But as Jesus teaches earlier in Luke 12, in the parable of the rich fool (Luke 12:13-21) our lives may be required of us tonight, making the timing of the end of days rather irrelevant.  He created us and has already set the number of our days.

Again we come back to faith.  Knowing that we belong to Christ, knowing that when we confess our sins and repent of them, He forgives us, our actions should reflect our confidence of knowing that God cares for us. Because He loved us first, in Him we have the capacity to love others, to be generous, to be good stewards of God’s good gifts and not fall into the panic of hoarding or obsessing over whether or not we will be provided for.

The path of the cross is not an easy one but it is a path that we follow knowing that we do fail and we do fall short.  We sin constantly.  We doubt.  Even though we are poor tools with which to work, Jesus is still on that path with us, lifting us up in our suffering, challenging us to die to our selfishness and insecurity, and to keep on remembering our baptism.  The old Adam needs to be drowned every day, because our sinful nature flares up often.  Yet Jesus keeps forgiving us and lifting us up. He equips us for the good fight of living out the faith.

The good news is that Jesus is stronger than the temptations of the world. He has defeated our sinful nature. He has put death to death for us. We take confidence that He gives us the gift of faith so that we will keep our eyes and hearts focused on Him.

Lord, help us keep our lamps trimmed and burning.  Create clean hearts in us all, clean hearts ready to serve you and to care for those around us.

April 16, 2020 – The Lord Reigns, Praise His Holy Name- Psalm 97

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The Lord reigns, let the earth be glad; let the distant shores rejoice.
Clouds and thick darkness surround him; righteousness and justice are the foundation of his throne.

Fire goes before him and consumes his foes on every side.
His lightning lights up the world;the earth sees and trembles.
The mountains melt like wax before the Lord,before the Lord of all the earth. The heavens proclaim his righteousness,and all peoples see his glory.              

All who worship images are put to shame,those who boast in idols—worship him, all you gods! 

Zion hears and rejoices and the villages of Judah are glad because of your judgments, Lord.

For you, Lord, are the Most High over all the earth; you are exalted far above all gods.

Let those who love the Lord hate evil, for he guards the lives of his faithful ones and delivers them from the hand of the wicked.  Light shines on the righteous and joy on the upright in heart.

Rejoice in the Lord, you who are righteous,and praise his holy name.           Psalm 97 (ESV)

The Lord reigns.  Let that one sink in. Governments and authorities are comprised of people like us-people who are sinful and fallible and often self serving. Distrust of elected officials on both sides of the political fence is at an all time high in these trying times for a variety of reasons, some more sound than others.  “Do not put your trust in princes, in human beings, who cannot save, (Psalm 146:3) is timeless advice.  We should be informed regarding public policy and events. We have not only a right but an obligation to question those in power, and to expect informed and truthful answers from them.

Even when it appears that those in power may be operating out of evil motives, our judgments are biased and not always correct. We should respectfully listen to and consider views that are contrary to our own even when we do not or cannot agree with them. Wrong decisions can be made with the right intentions and in good faith. Right decisions can appear to be wrong in the moment, but can end up being right in the long term.

As Americans in this representative republic, we need to ask questions and to hold elected officials accountable for their decisions and the impact their decisions have upon those they serve. Part of the reason why corruption and graft are so deeply ingrained in our current federal, state and local governments is because individuals do not ask the hard questions and do not demand accountability from our elected officials.

All who worship images are put to shame,those who boast in idols—worship him, all you gods! 

It is also easy for Christians to have a distorted view of the left hand kingdom (civil government,) either trusting in it as if it were an idol, giving it entirely too much power, or distancing themselves completely from civil discourse because “politics is a dirty business.”  For the time being, we live with one foot in each kingdom, which requires that we have the obligations of being a citizen of both.

We must be mindful of the Fourth Commandment’s requirement to honor the authorities placed over us. Good government is certainly a gift from God.  At the same time, the Nuremberg Defense (Befehl ist Befehl) is not a valid defense for a Christian.   To say, “I was only following orders,” when complying with a man made law that contradicts God’s laws is wrong.

The left hand kingdom is still subject to the sovereignty of Jesus, even if we have a hard time seeing the hand of God when officials display corrupt motives and wrong actions.  God can use even what seem to be the worst decisions at the moment for our ultimate good. With the perspective of hindsight we can see that even Pontius Pilate’s decisions and actions had a place in God’s good plan for us.

We must trust in the ultimate sovereignty of God, but at the same time, we cannot remain silent in the face of corruption, injustice, graft and wrong decisions.

Christians should be involved in political discourse. We back down from the public square to our peril and to the peril of our neighbors.  We must hold authorities accountable especially when their actions and policies are doing harm. Jesus Himself had no problem upturning the tables in the temple when the vendors were ripping people off.   However, we must engage in political discourse with the understanding that everyone involved in government, including ourselves, is a fallible, sinful human being. We can’t be as convinced as Jesus was in the righteousness of our motive or in the nobility of our cause.

 

The desire for control is written into each of our sinful natures.  The temptation of the Garden was the serpent whispering to Eve, “you will be like God.” The abuse of power and control is a tremendous temptation for those in authority.  Likewise the governed can have a rebellious nature against legitimate authorities, even when they should respect the authorities.

We come back to the Psalmist’s prayer: Let those who love the Lord hate evil, for he guards the lives of his faithful ones and delivers them from the hand of the wicked.  Light shines on the righteous and joy on the upright in heart.

It can be difficult to trust that God is in control even in the midst of trying times and in situations where public discourse can be intentionally inflammatory and plagued with misinformation or lack of information. It can be difficult to love and to be at peace with people we disagree with.  We pray that the Holy Spirit would bring us to a place in which we can work together for the common good and have peaceful discourse even when we disagree.  We pray that we would trust Jesus and know that He is truly the one in control- not us, not civil government, or any other entity.