May 4, 2020- Jesus Weeps Over Jerusalem – Luke 19:28-44

Jesus weeps over Jerusalem by Giovanni

And when he (Jesus) had said these things, he went on ahead, going up to Jerusalem. When he drew near to Bethphage and Bethany, at the mount that is called Olivet, he sent two of the disciples, saying, “Go into the village in front of you, where on entering you will find a colt tied, on which no one has ever yet sat. Untie it and bring it here. If anyone asks you, ‘Why are you untying it?’ you shall say this: ‘The Lord has need of it.’”  So those who were sent went away and found it just as he had told them. And as they were untying the colt, its owners said to them, “Why are you untying the colt?” And they said, “The Lord has need of it.” And they brought it to Jesus, and throwing their cloaks on the colt, they set Jesus on it.  And as he rode along, they spread their cloaks on the road. As he was drawing near—already on the way down the Mount of Olives—the whole multitude of his disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works that they had seen, saying, “Blessed is the King who comes in the name of the Lord! Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!” And some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, rebuke your disciples.” He answered, “I tell you, if these were silent, the very stones would cry out.”

And when he (Jesus) drew near and saw the city, he wept over it saying, “Would that you, even you, had known on this day the things that make for peace! But now they are hidden from your eyes. For the days will come upon you, when your enemies will set up a barricade around you and surround you and hem you in on every side and tear you down to the ground, you and your children within you. And they will not leave one stone upon another in you, because you did not know the time of your visitation.” Luke 19:28-44 (ESV)

There are two instances in Scripture where it is recorded that Jesus wept.   When His friend Lazarus died, Jesus wept. (John 11:35)  He weeps again here, not for Himself, but from the city of Jerusalem and the people of Israel.  Even though Jesus is the one going to His death, He weeps over the fate of the people who are right around Him, the people who He came to save, the people who reject Him.

The Pharisees wanted Jesus to keep His disciples quiet, but instead, Jesus reminds the Pharisees that, “if these were silent, the very stones would cry out.”

“The heavens declare the glory of God, and the sky above proclaims his handiwork, as we learn in Psalm 19:1.  Yet we don’t always see or acknowledge God’s hands in all things.  Even as God’s people we are afraid to share the love of God and the good news of the Gospel.  We don’t know what to say or when or how to say it.  We have friends and family who hear the Good News but it doesn’t register with them, just like the people of Jerusalem who had Jesus come to them in flesh and they couldn’t recognize Him for Who He was.

Jesus knew that He was on the hard, long road to Calvary as He came to the city of Jerusalem.  He also knew what was going to happen in Jerusalem in about another 35 years. In 70 AD the Romans captured and destroyed the city of Jerusalem.  Jesus wept for the people in the city who had no idea who He was. Jesus wept knowing that most of them would never know that He came to die to save them from their sins.  Jesus knew that many of His people would die without ever hearing the life-saving Gospel and coming to faith in Him.

Are we disturbed by the thought of people who Jesus bled and died to save are lost because they never heard the Good News?  The apostle Paul teaches us that saving faith in Jesus comes by hearing (Romans 10:17.)  The Holy Spirit works through the preaching of the Gospel and the teaching of God’s Word. Not everyone who hears will come to faith, and it is the Holy Spirit who works through preaching and teaching.  So all we can do is what we are told to do as believers in Jesus- preach the Word, tell the truth, and pray for those around us.

Do we weep – and pray- for those right here in our own community who haven’t heard about Jesus?  Do we reach out in love to those who have not yet come to saving faith, or are we going to leave it to the stones to cry out?

It’s by the grace of God that anyone comes to saving faith in Jesus.  It is a gift.  But God works through means, which means He works in and through His body, His followers, the church.  We cannot stay silent.

Lord, give us the courage to be bold in our faith and to live lives that glorify You.  Help us to share our faith and to pray for those who have not heard and who have not been brought to faith in You yet.

 

 

 

 

December 21, 2019 Advent 21, Luke 21- The Widow’s Mite, Destruction, War, and the Coming of the Son of Man

widow's mite

Read Luke 21.

Jesus looked up and saw the rich putting their gifts into the offering box,  and he saw a poor widow put in two small copper coins. And he said, “Truly, I tell you, this poor widow has put in more than all of them.  For they all contributed out of their abundance, but she out of her poverty put in all she had to live on.” Luke 21:1-4 (ESV)

At this time of year we are often concerned with giving gifts.  Most of us are giving out of our abundance.  It’s neither good nor necessary to give lavish gifts we can’t afford to people who already have too much stuff to begin with.  It is good to give generously and to those who have a genuine need.

God doesn’t need anything of ours.  Even if we were to have the resources to build a fine cathedral or to give large sums of money to the church, we don’t give in order to earn favor with God.  Jesus has done that for us as a gift.

Giving is an act of faith.  Some of us are capable of giving much, but others of us can only give a widow’s mite.  The motive behind our giving is our faith.  Do we trust God with all that we have and all that we are? (the answer is no, we can’t…)

The rest of the chapter is not very cheery.  Jesus foretells the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem, and of the things that will come to pass in the end times.

And while some were speaking of the temple, how it was adorned with noble stones and offerings, he said, “As for these things that you see, the days will come when there will not be left here one stone upon another that will not be thrown down.” And they asked him, “Teacher, when will these things be, and what will be the sign when these things are about to take place?” And he said, “See that you are not led astray. For many will come in my name, saying, ‘I am he!’ and, ‘The time is at hand!’ Do not go after them.And when you hear of wars and tumults, do not be terrified, for these things must first take place, but the end will not be at once.” Luke 21:5-9 (ESV)

It can be said that there have not been too many periods of time that the world (especially the Middle East) has been peaceful.  Since Jesus walked the earth there have been countless empires that have risen and fallen.  There have been wars, skirmishes, tumults and takeovers, coups, assassinations, intrigues and so much more man-made evil and violence. We long for peace and we pray for justice and mercy, only to see more wars, corrupt governments and injustice go merrily along.

We hear those who come to the table with false gospels- the false gospel of prosperity, the false belief that there is salvation in “social justice,” the name-it-and-claim-it, “best life now” self-help preachers, or the cults led by false prophets such as Jim Jones or David Koresh who claimed to be God, but were anything but. Jesus has warned us against those pseudo-christs that cannot save.

Christian people will face persecution for speaking out for Jesus.  In some places believers are martyred simply for standing up for Jesus and not backing down from their faith..  Jesus has warned us about this also:

This will be your opportunity to bear witness.  Settle it therefore in your minds not to meditate beforehand how to answer, for I will give you a mouth and wisdom, which none of your adversaries will be able to withstand or contradict. You will be delivered up even by parents and brothers and relatives and friends, and some of you they will put to death.  You will be hated by all for my name’s sake.  But not a hair of your head will perish.  By your endurance you will gain your lives. Luke 21:13-19 (ESV)

The Holy Spirit will give us the words to say if we are persecuted for our faith.  Jesus is faithful.  In the grand scheme of things, He has promised to keep us faithful to Him.

“And there will be signs in sun and moon and stars, and on the earth distress of nations in perplexity because of the roaring of the sea and the waves, people fainting with fear and with foreboding of what is coming on the world. For the powers of the heavens will be shaken. And then they will see the Son of Man coming in a cloud with power and great glory. Now when these things begin to take place, straighten up and raise your heads, because your redemption is drawing near.” Luke 21:25-28 (ESV)

There will always be war and dissent in this world, at least until Jesus returns.  The natural disasters, wars and other unrest will only escalate until that day. Yet our hope, Jesus is coming to redeem us and remake our world. For believers, this will be a day of great joy.

“But watch yourselves lest your hearts be weighed down with dissipation and drunkenness and cares of this life, and that day come upon you suddenly like a trap. For it will come upon all who dwell on the face of the whole earth.But stay awake at all times, praying that you may have strength to escape all these things that are going to take place, and to stand before the Son of Man.” Luke 21:34-36 (ESV)

As we come closer and closer to the celebration of Christmas- the Incarnation, Jesus coming to earth as a helpless child, we remember that Advent is also about being ready and awake for Jesus’ return.  He is the One Who holds us up and makes us able to stand. We pray that in Christ we will stand firm and that we will join the everlasting celebration on that day when He returns in glory.

December 19, 2019- Advent 19, Luke 19- To Seek and Save the Lost, Faithful Service, the King Comes to Jerusalem, and Cleans Out the Temple

 

zaccheus

Read Luke 19.

Zacchaeus was a rich man- a tax collector, who had likely come about his fortune from fleecing the flock.  Yet something compelled Zacchaeus to seek out Jesus.  We learn in the Gospel of John (John 6:44) that no one can come to Jesus unless the Father draws him.  The Greek word for draw (helkó) is a little more intense, having the connotation of dragging something incapable of moving itself.  We are given the gift of faith. It is given from outside of us and outside of our will.

Zacchaeus was a short man, so he climbed a tree to see Jesus better over the crowd. It must have been a sight to see this tiny little man, dressed in his finery, climbing a tree to get a better view.

And when Jesus came to the place, he looked up and said to him, “Zacchaeus, hurry and come down, for I must stay at your house today.”  So he hurried and came down and received him joyfully. And when they saw it, they all grumbled, “He has gone in to be the guest of a man who is a sinner.” And Zacchaeus stood and said to the Lord, “Behold, Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor. And if I have defrauded anyone of anything, I restore it fourfold.”  And Jesus said to him, “Today salvation has come to this house, since he also is a son of Abraham.  For the Son of Man came to seek and to save the lost.” Luke 19:5-9 (ESV)

Time after time it seems to be lost on the religious authorities that Jesus came precisely to name, and claim and save sinners.

In the Parable of the Ten Minas, Jesus teaches us about being trustworthy.  Faith is inextricably linked with action.  When we believe, we act, just as when we light a fire there is heat as well as light involved.

Do we really trust God that His provision is enough? Do we believe Jesus is Who He says He is, enough that we can be generous with the gifts He has given us and invest those gifts in others?

‘I tell you that to everyone who has, more will be given, but from the one who has not, even what he has will be taken away. Luke 19:26 (ESV) 

In Christ we have been given the calling to invest and freely give from the gifts He has first given us.

Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion! Shout aloud, O daughter of Jerusalem! Behold, your king is coming to you; righteous and having salvation is he, humble and mounted on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey. Zechariah 9:9 (ESV)

Jesus comes to Jerusalem on His way to Calvary.  As Zechariah the prophet foretold, He rides in on the colt of a donkey.

And when he had said these things, he went on ahead, going up to Jerusalem. When he drew near to Bethphage and Bethany, at the mount that is called Olivet, he sent two of the disciples, saying, “Go into the village in front of you, where on entering you will find a colt tied, on which no one has ever yet sat. Untie it and bring it here. If anyone asks you, ‘Why are you untying it?’ you shall say this: ‘The Lord has need of it.’”  So those who were sent went away and found it just as he had told them.  And as they were untying the colt, its owners said to them, “Why are you untying the colt?” And they said, “The Lord has need of it.”  And they brought it to Jesus, and throwing their cloaks on the colt, they set Jesus on it. And as he rode along, they spread their cloaks on the road. As he was drawing near—already on the way down the Mount of Olives—the whole multitude of his disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works that they had seen, saying, “Blessed is the King who comes in the name of the Lord! Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!” And some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, rebuke your disciples.”  He answered, “I tell you, if these were silent, the very stones would cry out.” Luke 19:28-40 (ESV)

The very stones would cry out praise to the living God, if the people had not been shouting.  The people may have mistaken Jesus for a military king or a bread king, but they didn’t see Him as the King.  Even His disciples didn’t get it that His kingdom wasn’t about power or free bread, but something much more far reaching.

As Jesus approached Jerusalem, He wept over the city.  Jerusalem, who should have seen Him as the King, the Son of David long awaited, crucified Him instead.  Jerusalem, the long suffering city,  would face destruction and judgment in AD 70.

And when he drew near and saw the city, he wept over it,  saying, “Would that you, even you, had known on this day the things that make for peace! But now they are hidden from your eyes.  For the days will come upon you, when your enemies will set up a barricade around you and surround you and hem you in on every side and tear you down to the ground, you and your children within you. And they will not leave one stone upon another in you, because you did not know the time of your visitation.” Luke 19:41-44 (ESV)

Upon Jesus’ arrival in Jerusalem (lest we believe the myth that Jesus never got angry,) He visited the Temple, only to find that it was inhabited by those trying to take advantage of pilgrims by charging exorbitant prices for money exchanges and animals for sacrifice.

And he (Jesus) entered the temple and began to drive out those who sold, saying to them, “It is written, ‘My house shall be a house of prayer,’ but you have made it a den of robbers.” And he was teaching daily in the temple. The chief priests and the scribes and the principal men of the people were seeking to destroy him, but they did not find anything they could do, for all the people were hanging on his words. Luke 19:45-49 (ESV)

Jesus does bring us peace, but He does not leave the world unchanged.

As the celebration of Jesus’ birth draws nearer, do we see how He is preparing us for the world to come when He returns?

Will He find us with our lamps burning bright, awaiting Him with joy?

Lord, be with us and transform our hearts.  Give us the faith to seek, knock and ask for Your provision in all things.

December 13, 2019- Advent 13, Luke 13 – Jesus Heals on the Sabbath (Again) Enter Through the Narrow Door, Lamenting for Jerusalem

o-jerusalem-greg-olsen

Read Luke 13.

There were some present at that very time who told him about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices. And he answered them, “Do you think that these Galileans were worse sinners than all the other Galileans, because they suffered in this way? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all likewise perish. Or those eighteen on whom the tower in Siloam fell and killed them: do you think that they were worse offenders than all the others who lived in Jerusalem? No, I tell you; but unless you repent, you will all likewise perish.” Luke 13:1-4 (ESV)

We like to categorize sins. In the earthly kingdom this makes sense, because the gravity of the penalties for our law-breaking is generally set by its impact on other people. No one would think of instituting capital punishment for stealing a stick of gum. God’s opinion about our sin is quite different. As the apostle James teaches us,

If you really fulfill the royal law according to the Scripture, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself,” you are doing well. But if you show partiality, you are committing sin and are convicted by the law as transgressors. For whoever keeps the whole law but fails in one point has become guilty of all of it. James 2:8-10 (ESV)

All of us are guilty of original sin and have inherited the sin of the Garden from our first parents, Adam and Eve. Because of the Fall, the world is broken. Bad things happen to everyone as well as good things. The rain falls on good and bad alike. We are not inherently “good” people. We have nothing intrinsically good about us. The only good that we have comes from outside of us, from Christ alone. Every single one of us has earned the penalty of death. Unless Christ returns first, we will all die. We will all suffer, and it doesn’t matter how “good” we have tried to be. None of us have earned or deserve God’s blessings, and none of us will escape worldly pain, loss or tragedy.

Repentance and faith in Christ do not prevent bad things from happening to any of us here on this fallen earth. But He is with us in and through our suffering and trials. He suffered and died to redeem us from our sins so that we will be with Him forever- but in this life here on earth we will bear His cross.

Jesus tells the parable of the fig tree to give an illustration of God’s grace. God gives the water and the sustenance. Yes, God is patient and kind. He gives people opportunities to hear the Gospel and come to faith in Him. Do we respond and bear fruit in keeping with repentance? There will come a time when there will be no more opportunities to seek, ask and knock. Will we be found to be trusting in Christ and forgiven by Him when the door of opportunity is closed?

Jesus has no problem cheesing off the Pharisees and legalists by healing on the Sabbath.

Now he (Jesus) was teaching in one of the synagogues on the Sabbath. And behold, there was a woman who had had a disabling spirit for eighteen years. She was bent over and could not fully straighten herself. When Jesus saw her, he called her over and said to her, “Woman, you are freed from your disability.” And he laid his hands on her, and immediately she was made straight, and she glorified God. But the ruler of the synagogue, indignant because Jesus had healed on the Sabbath, said to the people, “There are six days in which work ought to be done. Come on those days and be healed, and not on the Sabbath day.” Then the Lord answered him, “You hypocrites! Does not each of you on the Sabbath untie his ox or his donkey from the manger and lead it away to water it? And ought not this woman, a daughter of Abraham whom Satan bound for eighteen years, be loosed from this bond on the Sabbath day?” As he said these things, all his adversaries were put to shame, and all the people rejoiced at all the glorious things that were done by him. Luke 13:10-17 (ESV)

Jesus did care about the Law, in fact He was the fulfillment of the Law. Somewhere in the letter of the Law (and all the sub-laws and corollaries that got added to it) the heart of the Law, the Shema, got lost. Jesus had the heart for this suffering woman, while the Pharisees and officials were more worried about keeping Sabbath regulations that were man made.

He (Jesus) went on his way through towns and villages, teaching and journeying toward Jerusalem. And someone said to him, “Lord, will those who are saved be few?” And he said to them, “Strive to enter through the narrow door. For many, I tell you, will seek to enter and will not be able. When once the master of the house has risen and shut the door, and you begin to stand outside and to knock at the door, saying, ‘Lord, open to us,’ then he will answer you, ‘I do not know where you come from.’ Then you will begin to say, ‘We ate and drank in your presence, and you taught in our streets.’ But he will say, ‘I tell you, I do not know where you come from. Depart from me, all you workers of evil!’ In that place there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth, when you see Abraham and Isaac and Jacob and all the prophets in the kingdom of God but you yourselves cast out. And people will come from east and west, and from north and south, and recline at table in the kingdom of God. And behold, some are last who will be first, and some are first who will be last.” Luke 13:22-30 (ESV)

The world doesn’t have much use for Jesus and His message of sacrifice and suffering.

For the word of the cross is folly to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. 1 Corinthians 1:18 (ESV)

As the apostle Paul teaches us, the message of Jesus and His cross is folly to those who are perishing. Yet Jesus in His mercy, chooses us to follow Him, naming and claiming us in our baptism- the weak, the weary, we, the motley crew of assorted sinners, invited to His table of grace.

At that very hour some Pharisees came and said to him, “Get away from here, for Herod wants to kill you.” And he said to them, “Go and tell that fox, ‘Behold, I cast out demons and perform cures today and tomorrow, and the third day I finish my course. Nevertheless, I must go on my way today and tomorrow and the day following, for it cannot be that a prophet should perish away from Jerusalem.’ O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often would I have gathered your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you were not willing! Behold, your house is forsaken. And I tell you, you will not see me until you say, ‘Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!’” Luke 13:31-35 (ESV)

Jesus tells the Pharisees that He will rise again on the third day, but they don’t get the reference. On Palm Sunday He will enter in to Jerusalem amidst shouts of “Hosanna!” but by Friday He will be humiliated and put to death amidst cries of “Crucify Him!”

Jesus knows what will happen to Jerusalem in just a few years. He can see the destruction of AD 70 before it happens.

We await Jesus coming again in glory to judge the living and the dead, and to bring us to His kingdom that has no end.

April 16, 2019 – Here Comes Your King, the Lamb, the Son of God- Matthew 21:1-11

litter

Now when they drew near to Jerusalem and came to Bethphage, to the Mount of Olives, then Jesus sent two disciples, saying to them, “Go into the village in front of you, and immediately you will find a donkey tied, and a colt with her. Untie them and bring them to me. If anyone says anything to you, you shall say, ‘The Lord needs them,’ and he will send them at once.” This took place to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet, saying,

 “Say to the daughter of Zion,
‘Behold, your king is coming to you,
humble, and mounted on a donkey,
on a colt, the foal of a beast of burden.’” (Zechariah 9:9)

The disciples went and did as Jesus had directed them. They brought the donkey and the colt and put on them their cloaks, and he sat on them.  Most of the crowd spread their cloaks on the road, and others cut branches from the trees and spread them on the road.  And the crowds that went before him and that followed him were shouting, “Hosanna to the Son of David! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the highest!” And when he entered Jerusalem, the whole city was stirred up, saying, “Who is this?” And the crowds said, “This is the prophet Jesus, from Nazareth of Galilee.” Matthew 21:1-11 (ESV)

In Jesus’ day important people and rulers would have been carried in to the city in a litter borne by slaves, as Pilate most likely would have been carried into the city of Jerusalem before the Passover celebration. Pilate’s arrival would have been an important display of Roman might and hegemony- an entrance that would let the people know in no uncertain terms that the Pax Romana would be enforced by force.

Riding on a beast of burden such as a lowly donkey was not how earthly kings traveled. A good comparison today would be when the President comes to town. He arrives on Air Force One, and is further transported by motorcade, where he is transferred to “the Beast” limousine and is surrounded by security and peripheral vehicles.  The President arrives with pomp and circumstance because he’s important.  The President is not just some guy riding into downtown on a BMX bike with a few of his friends- but that was the sort of arrival that Jesus had.  Jesus didn’t storm in like an Important Guy.

The people in Jerusalem didn’t even know who Jesus was until the disciples and those who accompanied Him announced his identity. Perhaps some of the general public of Jerusalem was familiar with Zechariah’s prophecy of their king coming to them riding on a donkey. There may have been whispers and fleeting fantasies that This Might Be the Guy who will raise up a coup to defeat the Romans, and restore Jewish autonomy.

Unfortunately what most people didn’t understand about Jesus then and still do not understand is that His kingdom is not one of political hegemony or earthly strength or material prosperity. Jesus came to suffer and to be wounded unto death for our salvation, redemption and healing. His way was not one of being carried in on a litter to be praised, but to be spat on and beaten, to take up the cross, and to be put to death.

As Jesus said, “My kingdom is not of this world.”-John 18:36

He was to be given as a lamb to the slaughter, the Lamb who bears the sins of the world.

The cries of “Hosanna!” on Palm Sunday will turn in a few short days to, “Crucify Him!”

Jesus’ blood is upon us all. His blood is the blood of the Lamb, foreshadowed by the blood of the lambs spread on the doorposts during the Passover. We are the same people who cry, “Hosanna to the King!” one day, and we also cry, “Crucify Him!” as we sin and pursue our own way. When we were given the choice between Barabbas (the son of the father, of our father Adam) and the Son of God, we chose to save Barabbas, and in so doing, we sent Jesus to the cross.

The good news is that Jesus came to be King – not by upending Caesar or throwing the Romans out of Palestine, but by going to the cross. He did for us what we could never do- He made us worthy before God.

He paid the punishment that brings us peace.