January 28, 2020- Justice, God’s Servant, and Bruised Reeds- Isaiah 42:1-4

bruised-reed

Behold my servant, whom I uphold,
my chosen, in whom my soul delights;
I have put my Spirit upon him;
he will bring forth justice to the nations.

He will not cry aloud or lift up his voice,
or make it heard in the street;

a bruised reed he will not break,
and a faintly burning wick he will not quench;
he will faithfully bring forth justice.

He will not grow faint or be discouraged
till he has established justice in the earth;
and the coastlands wait for his law. Isaiah 42:1-4 (ESV)

Justice should be informed by truth. We all know what it feels like to be the object of injustice– when we are betrayed or blamed for the offenses of others, or we suffer consequences through no fault of our own.

The truth of fallen humanity is that we deserve justice- justice that rightfully means the wrath of God. Whether we like it or not (or agree with it or not) we have all inherited a fallen nature and we are subject to the effects of sin and death.

The Good News is that God has come with justice- justice poured out upon Jesus, the Servant Who is gentle with bruised reeds, Who does not put out an ember struggling to stay lit.

How could it be just for Jesus to take the wrath of God that we deserve?

The truth is that:  All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned—every one—to his own way; and the Lord has laid on him the iniquity of us all. – Isaiah 53:6 (ESV)

All of us are heavily burdened- and condemned- by the Law of God.  If we look at the Ten Commandments, we can clearly see that-

We fail to honor God and acknowledge Him above all things. 

We take God’s holy name in vain – and this encompasses far more than oaths and swearing.

We do not honor the Sabbath by willingly and eagerly worshiping God and learning and digesting God’s Word as we should. 

We do not honor our parents or those put in authority over us.

We may not physically kill people, but we murder others through slander and from failing to care for them. 

We have physical lusts that are impure, whether we act upon them or not, that betray chastity and faithfulness to one spouse.

We steal time, treasure and talents from others.

We often speak ill of others and fail to put the best construction on their motives and actions.

We lust after other people’s stuff. 

We envy other people their spouses or employees.

To further implicate us in our guilt, the apostle James teaches us: For whoever keeps the whole law but fails in one point has become guilty of all of it. James 2:10 (ESV)

Yet Jesus still has lifted the burden and has taken away the guilt of all our sins. He took on the weight of the curse of ALL of our sins.  The penalty for all of our iniquity is not placed on us, but was placed on Him.

From the mountain of Sinai, Moses was sent down carrying the tablets of the Law that condemns us all.  Thankfully condemnation and wrath are not the end of the story.

At the cross of Calvary, justice has been carried out. Not on all of us bruised reeds and faintly burning wicks who have been broken and condemned by the curse of sin, but solely upon Jesus, the Son of God, the Lamb of God, Who takes away the sins of the world.

Lord, we thank You that You are the Suffering Servant, the One Who took the punishment we deserved in our place.  The justice we deserved fell upon Your shoulders.  Forgive us for our many and constant sins, and give us the strength and the fortitude to live in a way that glorifies You.

 

January 13, 2020- To Fulfill all Righteousness- Jesus is Baptized- Matthew 3:13-17

jesus-baptism

Then Jesus came from Galilee to the Jordan to John, to be baptized by him. John would have prevented him, saying, “I need to be baptized by you, and do you come to me?” But Jesus answered him, “Let it be so now, for thus it is fitting for us to fulfill all righteousness.” Then he consented. And when Jesus was baptized, immediately he went up from the water, and behold, the heavens were opened to him, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove and coming to rest on him; and behold, a voice from heaven said, “This is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased.” Matthew 3:13-17 (ESV)

Why did Jesus, our sinless Savior, need baptism?

Jesus did not need baptism, because He had no sins. We needed Jesus to be baptized. He was baptized into our humanity and He was drenched in the cesspool of human sins. The reason why He came to earth was to take on the sins of the world- a burden that only He could choose or walk away from.

Yet His choice to take on the burden of human sin and follow through with the task of winning our redemption was well pleasing to God the Father, even though the cup He had to drink- the pain, the scorn, the shame, and ultimately being forsaken by the Father would be nearly impossible to bear.

One of the ways to look at Jesus’ baptism is that it was at that moment He took on the sins of humanity- all of them- past, present, future, so that along with His body all of those sins would be nailed to the cross. The sins that are washed from us in the waters of baptism are put on to Jesus in His baptism.

We see a foreshadowing of Jesus’ blood atonement to wash away our sins in Leviticus 16, in the Law’s requirement for the Israelites to sacrifice animals:

“Then he shall kill the goat of the sin offering that is for the people and bring its blood inside the veil and do with its blood as he did with the blood of the bull, sprinkling it over the mercy seat and in front of the mercy seat. Thus he shall make atonement for the Holy Place, because of the uncleannesses of the people of Israel and because of their transgressions, all their sins. And so he shall do for the tent of meeting, which dwells with them in the midst of their uncleannesses. No one may be in the tent of meeting from the time he enters to make atonement in the Holy Place until he comes out and has made atonement for himself and for his house and for all the assembly of Israel. Then he shall go out to the altar that is before the Lord and make atonement for it, and shall take some of the blood of the bull and some of the blood of the goat, and put it on the horns of the altar all around. And he shall sprinkle some of the blood on it with his finger seven times, and cleanse it and consecrate it from the uncleannesses of the people of Israel.

And when he has made an end of atoning for the Holy Place and the tent of meeting and the altar, he shall present the live goat. And Aaron shall lay both his hands on the head of the live goat, and confess over it all the iniquities of the people of Israel, and all their transgressions, all their sins. And he shall put them on the head of the goat and send it away into the wilderness by the hand of a man who is in readiness. The goat shall bear all their iniquities on itself to a remote area, and he shall let the goat go free in the wilderness.” – Leviticus 16:15-26 (ESV)

In His baptism, Jesus became the sacrifice that the blood sacrifices and the scapegoat of Leviticus 16 foreshadowed.

The problem with the sacrifices and scapegoats called for in Leviticus was that they never really absolved the people of their sins. The Law (of which the sacrificial system was a part) could only show us our sins and point us to the Savior- the one Who is the Lamb of God, Who takes away the sins of the world.

For since the law has but a shadow of the good things to come instead of the true form of these realities, it can never, by the same sacrifices that are continually offered every year, make perfect those who draw near. Otherwise, would they not have ceased to be offered, since the worshipers, having once been cleansed, would no longer have any consciousness of sins? But in these sacrifices there is a reminder of sins every year. For it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins. Hebrews 10:1-4 (ESV)

The writer of Hebrews reminds us that it was only because Jesus took our sins on Him and became our sacrifice that we are justified in the eyes of God and our sins are paid for- nailed to the cross and washed away in Jesus’ death and resurrection.

The apostle Paul reminds us in Romans 6:1-12 that as we are baptized, we are joined with Jesus in His baptism as well as in His death and resurrection.

Jesus took on our sins for us, to defeat the curse of the Fall, so that we may have life and salvation in Him.

Our salvation is a free gift, beyond anything we can earn or deserve. Baptized, we live, because Jesus lives. He gives us the gift of faith. He gives us grace to keep putting on our baptism every day so we continue to live in Him. He has fulfilled the Law for us because we cannot. He is indeed the Good News.

We pray that Jesus would constantly keep us in His care and that He would continue to keep us strong in faith and trust in Him.