January 13, 2020- To Fulfill all Righteousness- Jesus is Baptized- Matthew 3:13-17

jesus-baptism

Then Jesus came from Galilee to the Jordan to John, to be baptized by him. John would have prevented him, saying, “I need to be baptized by you, and do you come to me?” But Jesus answered him, “Let it be so now, for thus it is fitting for us to fulfill all righteousness.” Then he consented. And when Jesus was baptized, immediately he went up from the water, and behold, the heavens were opened to him, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove and coming to rest on him; and behold, a voice from heaven said, “This is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased.” Matthew 3:13-17 (ESV)

Why did Jesus, our sinless Savior, need baptism?

Jesus did not need baptism, because He had no sins. We needed Jesus to be baptized. He was baptized into our humanity and He was drenched in the cesspool of human sins. The reason why He came to earth was to take on the sins of the world- a burden that only He could choose or walk away from.

Yet His choice to take on the burden of human sin and follow through with the task of winning our redemption was well pleasing to God the Father, even though the cup He had to drink- the pain, the scorn, the shame, and ultimately being forsaken by the Father would be nearly impossible to bear.

One of the ways to look at Jesus’ baptism is that it was at that moment He took on the sins of humanity- all of them- past, present, future, so that along with His body all of those sins would be nailed to the cross. The sins that are washed from us in the waters of baptism are put on to Jesus in His baptism.

We see a foreshadowing of Jesus’ blood atonement to wash away our sins in Leviticus 16, in the Law’s requirement for the Israelites to sacrifice animals:

“Then he shall kill the goat of the sin offering that is for the people and bring its blood inside the veil and do with its blood as he did with the blood of the bull, sprinkling it over the mercy seat and in front of the mercy seat. Thus he shall make atonement for the Holy Place, because of the uncleannesses of the people of Israel and because of their transgressions, all their sins. And so he shall do for the tent of meeting, which dwells with them in the midst of their uncleannesses. No one may be in the tent of meeting from the time he enters to make atonement in the Holy Place until he comes out and has made atonement for himself and for his house and for all the assembly of Israel. Then he shall go out to the altar that is before the Lord and make atonement for it, and shall take some of the blood of the bull and some of the blood of the goat, and put it on the horns of the altar all around. And he shall sprinkle some of the blood on it with his finger seven times, and cleanse it and consecrate it from the uncleannesses of the people of Israel.

And when he has made an end of atoning for the Holy Place and the tent of meeting and the altar, he shall present the live goat. And Aaron shall lay both his hands on the head of the live goat, and confess over it all the iniquities of the people of Israel, and all their transgressions, all their sins. And he shall put them on the head of the goat and send it away into the wilderness by the hand of a man who is in readiness. The goat shall bear all their iniquities on itself to a remote area, and he shall let the goat go free in the wilderness.” – Leviticus 16:15-26 (ESV)

In His baptism, Jesus became the sacrifice that the blood sacrifices and the scapegoat of Leviticus 16 foreshadowed.

The problem with the sacrifices and scapegoats called for in Leviticus was that they never really absolved the people of their sins. The Law (of which the sacrificial system was a part) could only show us our sins and point us to the Savior- the one Who is the Lamb of God, Who takes away the sins of the world.

For since the law has but a shadow of the good things to come instead of the true form of these realities, it can never, by the same sacrifices that are continually offered every year, make perfect those who draw near. Otherwise, would they not have ceased to be offered, since the worshipers, having once been cleansed, would no longer have any consciousness of sins? But in these sacrifices there is a reminder of sins every year. For it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins. Hebrews 10:1-4 (ESV)

The writer of Hebrews reminds us that it was only because Jesus took our sins on Him and became our sacrifice that we are justified in the eyes of God and our sins are paid for- nailed to the cross and washed away in Jesus’ death and resurrection.

The apostle Paul reminds us in Romans 6:1-12 that as we are baptized, we are joined with Jesus in His baptism as well as in His death and resurrection.

Jesus took on our sins for us, to defeat the curse of the Fall, so that we may have life and salvation in Him.

Our salvation is a free gift, beyond anything we can earn or deserve. Baptized, we live, because Jesus lives. He gives us the gift of faith. He gives us grace to keep putting on our baptism every day so we continue to live in Him. He has fulfilled the Law for us because we cannot. He is indeed the Good News.

We pray that Jesus would constantly keep us in His care and that He would continue to keep us strong in faith and trust in Him.

December 27, 2016 – Putting the Rubber to the Road- Mark 1:9-13

The Temptation in the Wilderness 1824 by John St John Long 1798-1834

In those days Jesus came from Nazareth of Galilee and was baptized by John in the Jordan. And just as he was coming up out of the water, he saw the heavens torn apart and the Spirit descending like a dove on him.  And a voice came from heaven, “You are my Son, the Beloved; with you I am well pleased.”

And the Spirit immediately drove him out into the wilderness.  He was in the wilderness forty days, tempted by Satan; and he was with the wild beasts; and the angels waited on him. – Mark 1:9-13 (NRSV)

Of the four Gospels, only Mark completely omits any kind of nativity story.  Only Luke and Matthew go into details on the nativity, while John, in his rather otherworldly and ethereal way, makes the parallel between Jesus the Light of the World, and the Genesis creation narrative.

Mark goes right to the rubber hitting the road. Jesus was baptized, approved by God, and no sooner than He could turn around, He was stranded in the wilderness. Thanks, Mark. No fanfare or singing or shepherds or Mary pondering in her heart.  Mark gets down to the nitty gritty right away.

This sort of sounds like the story of most of our lives.  We just sort of end up plopped down in the wilderness at times.  We should expect Jesus in His humanity to be put in that wilderness situation.  God put Him in this world not to stash Him in an ivory tower and shield Him from all the dirty, painful and nasty aspects of humanity, but to immerse Him completely in the human experience.  How else was He supposed to be Emmanuel, God with us?

It’s telling that God equipped Jesus to sustain Him.  He gave Him what He needed to overcome the challenges He faced.  He did not take Jesus’ challenges away from Him.  He did not just snap His fingers and give Jesus an easy, uncomplicated life.  God did not play the old literary device of deus ex machina- literally “the god in the machine” in Jesus’ life. He didn’t just lift Jesus up out of troubles as if He were a hero in an action movie.  Jesus had to endure, and fight and suffer.

God gives us the resources we need to overcome temptation.  He gives us the strength to endure and overcome challenges, but normally He doesn’t just “magically” lift us out of them.

In the words of the great theologian, Mick Jagger, and the Rolling Stones, “you can’t always get what you want/ you can try sometimes / you just might find/ you get what you need.”  God might not give us what we want, but He does provide what we need. He doesn’t always give us what we need in the ways we expect, either.

I’m not sure why God allows us to go through suffering or trials. That to me is a mystery of faith that I will not understand this side of Heaven, and perhaps not even on the other side.  I do know that in suffering and trials He does sustain us and He does give us what we need to overcome and grow through them. That answer just has to be good enough for now.

If the goal in our earthly sojourn is for to become more like Jesus then we too, have to trust God and hang on when the rubber hits the road.  We aren’t called to a pristine, clean and untested faith, but one where we get dirty, make mistakes, suffer, cry out in pain, and struggle with questions and doubt.  Those are also parts of the journey- the one that Jesus came to earth to travel as well.